Effective leadership is putting first things first. 


Explaining and understanding the nature of good leadership is probably easier than practising it. Good leadership requires deep human qualities, beyond conventional notions of authority.

In the modern age good leaders are an enabling force, helping people and organizations to perform and develop, which implies that a sophisticated alignment be achieved - of people's needs, and the aims of the organization.

The traditional concept of a leader being the directing chief at the top of a hierachy is nowadays a very incomplete appreciation of what true leadership must be.

Effective leadership does not necessarily require great technical or intellectual capacity. These attributes might help, but they are not pivotal.

Good leadership in the modern age more importantly requires attitudes and behaviours which characterise and relate to humanity.

The concept of serving is fundamental to the leadership role. Good leadership involves serving the organization or group and the people within it. Ineffective leaders tend to invert this principle and consider merely that the leader must be served by the people. This faulty idea fosters the notion that leadership as an opportunity to take: to acquire personal status, advantage, gain, etc., at the expense of others, which is grossly wrong. Leadership is instead an opportunity to give; to serve the organization, and crucially the people too. The modern notions of 'servant leader' and 'servant leadership' are attributed to Robert K Greenleaf (in his 1970 essay The Servant as Leader) however the philosophy and concept of leadership being a serving function rather than one that is served, is very old indeed and found in ancient civilisations and religious writings.

Leadership is centrally concerned with people. Of course leadership involves decisions and actions relating to all sorts of other things, but leadership is special compared to any other role because of its unique responsibilty for people - i.e., the followers of the leader - in whatever context leadership is seen to operate.




Courage is the main quality of leadership, no matter where it is exercised



If it's not clear already, leadership is without doubt mostly about behaviour, especially towards others. People who strive for these things generally come to be regarded and respected as a leader by their people:

  • Integrity - the most important requirement; without it everything else is for nothing.
  • Having an effective appreciation and approach towards corporate responsibility, (Triple Bottom Line, Fair Trade, etc), so that the need to make profit is balanced with wider social and environmental responsibilities.
  • Being very grown-up - never getting emotionally negative with people - no shouting or ranting, even if you feel very upset or angry.
  • Leading by example - always be seen to be working harder and more determinedly than anyone else.
  • Helping alongside your people when they need it.
  • Fairness - treating everyone equally and on merit.
  • Being firm and clear in dealing with bad or unethical behaviour.
  • Listening to and really understanding people, and show them that you understand (this doesn't mean you have to agree with everyone - understanding is different to agreeing).
  • Always taking the responsibility and blame for your people's mistakes.
  • Always giving your people the credit for your successes.
  • Never self-promoting.
  • Backing-up and supporting your people.
  • Being decisive - even if the decision is to delegate or do nothing if appropriate - but be seen to be making fair and balanced decisions.
  • Asking for people's views, but remain neutral and objective.
  • Being honest but sensitive in the way that you give bad news or criticism.
  • Always doing what you say you will do - keeping your promises.
  • Working hard to become expert at what you do technically, and at understanding your people's technical abilities and challenges.
  • Encouraging your people to grow, to learn and to take on as much as they want to, at a pace they can handle.
  • Always accentuating the positive (say 'do it like this', not 'don't do it like that').
  • Smiling and encouraging others to be happy and enjoy themselves.
  • Relaxing - breaking down the barriers and the leadership awe - and giving your people and yourself time to get to know and respect each other.
  • Taking notes and keeping good records.
  • Planning and prioritising.
  • Managing your time well and helping others to do so too.
  • Involving your people in your thinking and especially in managing change.
  • Reading good books, and taking advice from good people, to help develop your own understanding of yourself, and particularly of other people's weaknesses (some of the best books for leadership are not about business at all - they are about people who triumph over adversity).
  • Achieve the company tasks and objectives, while maintaining your integrity, the trust of your people, are a balancing the corporate aims with the needs of the world beyond.

Every gift God has given is meant to be shared with others. Salvation. Encouragement. Prayer & more. Especially Leadership. Raise people up!

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